Crochet Along: How to Change Colours

changing yarn crochet

How is your blanket going? or should I say “growing”?! I have seen some lovely colour combinations around the net so I’m looking forward to seeing what everyone links up today.

But first I need to explain how to change colours for those who haven’t quite got to that yet. I’m changing colours at the end of a row but the principle is exactly the same if you were in the middle of a row – just leave out Step 3 where we are doing chains to start the next row. (Forgive my slightly blurry photos on this tutorial – I took them while waiting for my daughter at Bike Safety Day with my iPhone! Yes, I can work anywhere!)

This is the way I change yarn or add new yarn in blankets, but there are other ways. This method also lets me cover the yarn tails in the next row of stitches so that I don’t have to weave those ends into my blanket at the end. I don’t enjoy going back and weaving in the ends so I love this method! (Thanks to my friend Paige who first showed me how to do this.)

How to Change Yarn

Step 1:

Cut off your current yarn (in my case that’s the green yarn) about 5″ or 12cm from your last stitch. Leave the crochet hook in your last stitch.

changing yarn crochet

Step 2:

Take your second yarn (in my case it is grey) and knot it with the first as close as you can to the crochet hook. Leave a similar 5″ or 12cm tail of the second yarn too.

changing yarn crochet

Step 3:

This is the start of a new row so chain two stitches with the new yarn. (Leave out this step if you are changing yarn in the middle of a row.)

Step 4:

Lay the two tails of yarn along the top of the previous row. We are going to cover these with the next row of stitches so that we don’t have to weave them in later.

changing yarn crochet

Step 5:

Start working your double crochet along the next row of the blanket. By holding the ends along the top of the previous row, they will naturally be caught within the stitches. I usually work over the top of them until I get to the end of them. Sometimes you need to just give them a gentle tug so the initial knot is hidden under the first stitch.

You can change colour as often as you want to in your blanket. I have done 5 rows of double crochet before I changed colour on this blanket, but I’m still thinking about whether I will do 5 rows of this colour as well or less rows of it. One of the things I love about this type of blanket is that I can make up my mind about it as I go along.

crochet blanket green grey progress

Share your Progress

Your turn! Link up your pictures so we can see how you’re going. You can link a blog post or Facebook update (if it is public) or a picture from Instagram or Flickr. Just find the URL for your post then follow the prompts in the Linky tool.

If you are sharing on social media, remember to use the hashtag #CrochetAlong so we can all find each other.



 

Tonya Grant (288 Posts)

Tonya is the voice behind TheCraftyMummy.com. She dabbles in lots of different crafts – patchwork, quilting, cross-stitch, scrapbooking, knitting, crochet and sewing. She also writes about blogging and social media.


Comments

  1. Will hopefully have some time to post my progress over the weekend. It’s not much though. But I have made a start 🙂
    Actually Amy recently posted..Book Week 2013My Profile

  2. I shall post a pic of my squares that I have done so far over the weekend, have had to attend to other things for last couple of days and my squares are sitting here looking at me… once again great tutorial as I always struggle when changing colours. Thank you.. 🙂
    Lynne recently posted..Sweet Pouch SwapMy Profile

  3. I’ve posted my progress on my facebook page with the hashtag but don’t know what the next step is to link it up.

  4. I’m making progress on mine, but not sure how to share the pictures – no blog, and not sharing it with all my facebook friends!

  5. mine is going good it was going to be pastel with red but something happened and its huge!!!!!!!!!! http://liannesday.blogspot.com.au/

  6. Finally made a start and making a good progress. Looking at the close up of yours Tonya it looks like a treble to me and I’ve only done a double crochet. I think I didn’t read the fine print properly. LOL Can’t wait to see everyone’s completed projects.

    Anne xx

  7. Jan Fitzpatrick says:

    I have finished one using rainbow colours and have nearly finished a second using variegated colours, highlighted with red and have yarn for a third. However I notice your work seems tighter and closer than mine. Any clues? Keep up your good work, I really look forward to your blogs. Regards, Jan

  8. Sewing in ends is my least favorite thing! This is awesome! Do you think it would be sturdy enough to use for crochet hats?
    Nicole recently posted..Reserved order for Stephanie H.: Hooded Cowl in Eggplant and Fisherman, no ears by ColeyKCrochetMy Profile

  9. Does it stay when you wash it?

Trackbacks

  1. […] Now you’re back at the top of your chain and your spiral should be curling as you go. Cut the red yarn and join the green yarn. (You can read how I do that in this post.) […]

  2. […] Click here to learn to change colours […]

  3. […] Your blanket will continue to grow as you work your way along each row.  Next week I’ll explain how to join a new ball of yarn when you finish a ball and how to change colours. […]

  4. […] At the end of row 3 I changed colours. So if you wish to do that tie off here and change colours. […]

  5. […] See how to had a new ball of yarn or change colours here. […]

  6. […] Scarves are perhaps my favourite item to crochet in any waiting room. They are never going to grow too big to shove into a bag and you often only need one or two balls of yarn so they are small to carry. For an interesting scarf, try using a ball of variegated yarn – a yarn that is more than one colour. That way you can get the look of multiple colours without having to actually change yarns. (Not that changing yarns is that tricky – see my tutorial here.) […]

Leave a Comment

*

CommentLuv badge

Want crafty news in your inbox monthly?     Get it HERE!